5 Biggest & Scariest Tanks Ever Built, Trends Viral Go


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5 Biggest & Scariest Tanks

Born out of the need to break the British stalemate of World War one. The tank re-energized the battlefield and it's important in military planning sword the mission of the tank also expanded beyond breaking through enemy defences and began to include capturing and holding land. This led to the development of some truly mammoth tank designs that were intended to be the be-all and end-all of battlefield Weapons. Here are five of the biggest and scariest tanks ever built.

Char to see

Char To See, Trends Viral Go
Char To See

Number one being the most intimidating machine of world war ii. Char to see, the French saw the first British tanks and were immediately impressed. Thus, their leadership demanded their own machines. The first French tank the Schneider ca1 had a poor start to the war but later tanks such as the Renault ft was both revolutionary and successful. Learning from these experiences. The French began work on a new type that would be built in three distinct classes each heavier than the last culminating in a 69-ton vehicle, known as the “char to see”. the project meant heavy political resistance delaying end and resulting in the cancellation of the two smaller models until only, the 69-turn chart was left. ten were built entering service in 1921. Amis were truly gargantuan machines standing and nearly thirteen points five feet tall and thirty-three-point eight feet long. Compare this to the US Army's current tank the “m1a2 abrams” which stands at just eight feet tall and 26 feet long. The tank had a crew of 12 including three in the turret who aimed unfired. The 75-millimetre gun another turret was at the rear housing a Hotchkiss machine gun well three more machine guns were located on the sides and the front of the home armour was thick for the time. But this advantage would deteriorate as tanks became better armed in the 1930. Some of the 10 tanks were modified over time to trial new weapons and armour but by the time war broke out again in 1939. They were hopelessly outclassed by newer German anti-tank guns. they did however create an excellent impression on the French public and we used in morale boosting propaganda where they appeared to be invulnerable mobile fortresses. The truth was far from it however and all, but one would be destroyed by the French as defeat nyet the survivor was taken back to Germany as a war trophy where it disappeared in the chaos of the end of the Third Reich.

Tiger

Tiger, Trends Viral Go
Tiger

Tiger to Germany's tank forces were a mixed bag in the late 1930, consisting of mainly lighter vehicles and a few medium types. And their success in 1939 and 1940 was thanks largely to superior tactics however, German engineers were working on newer types that would unquestionably dominate the battlefield. As early as 1937 resulting in the tiger one which ended the fray in 1942. This spectacular vehicle with its heavy armour an 88-millimetre gun outperformed virtually every allied tank at the time and remained a significant threat until the end of the war. But the Germans were not satisfied with this success and began work on the tiger to an even better protected version which could take on superior numbers of the enemy's best tanks with confidence. A consequence of this was a significantly increased size and weight being just under 70 tons known as the King Tiger to the Allies. The new tank entered service in late 1944 and its impact was immediately found but while it could destroy nearly everything is encountered. It was extremely cumbersome and slow. In the fast-moving battlefield. It was left behind by the main force on several occasions allowing it to be overwhelmed or destroyed by air-power. But when it was expected to hold territory it was a truly lethal obstacle to the Allies. It may not be the largest tank on this list nor the most heavily armed or protecting it but without doubt it had the greatest impact on the battlefield.

Tog 1 & 2

Tog 1 and 2, trends viral go
Tog 1 & 2

The tog 1 & 2 when war with Germany loomed again in the late 1930s the Western Allies anticipated another great static conflict across the fields of Europe. In July 1939. The British set up the special vehicle committee that included many of those who designed the original mark 1 tank to conceive of new tanks to breach enemy trenches and fortifications. This resulted in the 80 turns “Tog 1” tog meaning the old gang about the veteran tank designers. The older thinking and tank design was obvious the track ran the entire circumference of the hole. It could reach just 8.7 miles per hour while it carried its main 75-millimetre gun in the forward hull although a turret was located on top. It was more heavily armoured than most British and German tanks of their period. However, the secondary prototype was redesigned where they reduced track diameter but no longer run over the top of the tank and a few other minor changes becoming the “Tog 2” - unfortunately for the projects. The fighting in the Second World War was anything but static and it was thanks to the smaller medium tanks working in conjunction with air and artillery support breaking quickly through defensive lines and capturing objectives work soon slowed on the TOG tanks and ceased altogether in 1943. The tog 1 was scrapped but the tog 2 can be seen today at the Bovington Tank Museum.

T28 super-heavy tank

T28 super-heavy tank, trends viral go
T28 super-heavy tank

As the French constructed the Maginot Line during the 1930 to protect them from Nazi Germany. Hitler ordered that his forces should do the same in case the Maginot Line embolden the French to attack first. Dubbed the west wall by the Germans it was known as the Siegfried line and over time became an extremely dense network of fortifications and tank obstacles as the Allies planned the invasion of Europe. It became clear that after liberating France they would have to face this immense of defensive barrier. And this led to proposals to develop a new tank specifically to breach it. The US Army and Ordnance departments met in March 1944 to finalize the tank design which was then given to the Pacific car and foundry company to manufacture. The resulting t28 super-heavy tank was a Goliath of a vehicle weighing in at 86 tons. It features a distinctive double set of tracks on either side of the hull, was armed with a 105-millimetre gun. When regular US tanks had a 75-millimetre gun and was exceptionally heavily armoured to withstand persistent enemy fire. The downsides of all this was that the gun had to be mounted in a hull being the tank had to turn to aim it. Its mobility was appalling being able to reach just eight miles per hour. Nevertheless, it could have proven useful in breaching the Siegfried line, had the Allies not already done so by the time. Testing was complete it was then planned to be used to storm the Japanese home islands, but the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki put an end to that goal. Only two vehicles were ever completed before the project was deemed obsolete and abandoned.

Panzer 8 Mouse

Panzer 8 Mouse
Panzer 8 Mouse

During World War two the Germans were far more enthusiastic about super-heavy tanks than their allied counterparts. By 1943 they were becoming increasingly outnumbered on the battlefield and super-heavy tanks seemed to be the answer. Since they could in theory destroy large numbers of smaller and less armoured vehicles and break through enemy lines to achieve strategic goals. One of the Jim and proponents of these tanks was ferdinand porsche who would later become famous for his sports cars. He conceived of a tank mounting a 128-millimetre gun, any rotating turret that could out range and destroy any allied tank then in service. The tank would also be exceptionally heavily armoured to such an extent that would be almost invulnerable to enemy tank formations. Many times, its number originally called the mama or mammoth. It eventually received the name Maus although weighing in as a class all 118 tons. It was anything but small in fact, it remains the heaviest armoured fighting vehicle of all time. Although this made it too heavy to cross many of you UPS bridges which would cause serious problems. When it came to deploy it to the front, as a result it was designed to Ford rivers with the crew being fed oxygen via a long snorkel Armour on the Maus was over twice as thick as on the earlier tiger one tank. which was already greatly feared by allied tank crews, and as well as the 120-millimetre gun. It also featured an additional 75-millimetre gun the first prototype - the turret was completed in December 1943. The second with a turret a new engine in June 1944. Testing was extensively carried out at the Boblingen test facility. The results of wedge were considered generally satisfactory. Although the first prototype had suspension issues while the second had reliability problems with the engines. It was understandably even more awkward than the King Tiger to maneuver and was only half as fast work continued several other prototypes. before the war took its toll on the project and they were cancelled before being destroyed. To prevent their capture by the Soviets the two working prototypes were ordered to assist in the defence runs north but was subsequently damaged by explosive charges placed on them by the Germans. When they had to abandon them. The Soviets recovered the racks and salvaged the turrets from the second vehicle to fit on the first prototype for a series of trials in 1946. Afterwards, the hybrid tank was put on display at the kubinka Museum where it remains today. There have been stories that a third Mouse was completed and fourth an action against American m18 hellcat where it was destroyed and then buried. But this has never been confirmed. Just how affected the mouse would have been in combat has long been the subject of debate amongst military historians. But it cannot be denied that it was a truly amazing piece of military engineering.

So that's five at the biggest and scariest tanks ever built truly terrifying machines.


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