Real-Life Mad Scientist's, That Went Way Too Far



Real-Life Mad Scientist's


The character of the mad scientist is particularly prevalent throughout modern fiction. A caricature of a professor frequently described as insane from particularly taboo or overly ambitious research. The character type first started appearing in the early 1800s. With the title character from Mary Shelley's Frankenstein being potentially the earliest example. Our list today is about real-life Frankenstein's. Scientists of all fields with particularly unhinged goals or practices. While it's easy to write off a caricature as just being a caricature. There have been many examples of mad scientist's in more recent years from brains kept alive outside the body to a real-life cyborg. Today we're counting down our picks for real-life mad scientist's, that went way too far.

Robert White

Robert White
Robert White

At number 5 we have Robert White an American brain surgeon and someone whose work could be considered some of the most stomach churning on this list when you hear someone specializes in neuro surgery. And a list entitled scientist that went too far. You can expect to hear the details of some gross experiments White was the first person to successfully remove the brain of a dog and keep it alive outside of the dog's body. And furthermore, graft the vascular system on to other dogs, serious mad scientist territory he proved using technology that monitored brain activity. That he could keep high levels of activity and manage to keep the animals alive for two days. If that's not stranger messed up enough for your tastes. White succeeded in transplanting one monkey's head onto the body of another monkey. Seriously he didn't attempt to connect the two monkey parts nervous systems and so had to keep the subject monkeys body alive through mechanical ventilation and drugs to stimulate the heart. What's even more creepy as this experiment was a success with the monkeys being able to chew and swallow food and track moving objects. The animals of course died up to three days after the surgery. Usually from blood clots forming from the grafting of the blood vessels but for a limited time. At least his experiment certainly was successful to him. Animal rights activists considered the entire practice barbaric not that they were wrong. The process of killing animals via grotesque surgery is definitely something, most would consider highly unethical. The backlash white received over his mad experiments was huge with protesters interrupting a banquet in his honor by offering him a bloody human head replica and with white being compared to dr. Frankenstein. During a civil hearing though we can certainly see why someone might evoke that comparison. Robert White isn't the most freaking Stein desk scientist on this list.

Jose Manuel Rodriguez Delgado

Jose Manuel Rodriguez Delgado
Jose Manuel Rodriguez Delgado

In our number-4 spot we've put Jose Manuel Rodriguez Delgado a professor of physiology at Yale. Whose work carries implications both fascinating and terrifying. Delgado's work was focused around the power of mind control. It's oversimplifying his work but it's essentially what he did. His work revolved around the use of a tiny device he invented called the stylus Seaver created in 1963. A radio which connected a brainwave stimulator with a receiver. This device was an improvement from his earlier equipment which would lead to visual disturbances an infection in many subjects. The stylus Seaver essentially could be used to control the thoughts and actions of the subject it was implanted in through radio waves. At first Delgado found that he could control the emotions of subjects using the receiver but later found out that if this time Seaver was used to stimulate the motor cortex it can elicit specific physical reactions from subjects. Real-life mind control used to move limbs or control appetites potentially. The most well-known use of this time oh Seaver occurred at a bulb reading branch. When Delgado joined the bull in the ring the bowl unsurprisingly with a stylus Eber in its brain, with the press of one button the ball stopped. Its charge the research is fascinating in a really morbid sort of way and most would definitely consider it highly unethical with comments on reports of Delgado's work calling him a sadistic psychopath and telling him to rot in hell. Make no mistake creating mind-control devices definitely pushes Delgado into mad scientist territory. It's unnerving to think the technology most of us have only considered within the realms of science fiction existed decades ago. Delgado could still be alive and controlling all of us with Stein Moe severs. After all, how do we know he isn't.

Kevin Warwick

Kevin Warwick
Kevin Warwick

Our mad scientist in our number three spot is Kevin Warwick. A lot of people have expressed interest in just how cool it would be for humanity to bridge the gap between man and machine being able to use robotic technology to enhance ourselves. Even earning the title of cyborg Kevin Warwick is nicknamed captain cyborg. For reasons you can probably guess they're already here though project cyborg sounds like an 80s sci-fi film in the vein of star kid. It's the name of a set of experiments that Warwick a British engineer and deputy vice-chancellor of research at Coventry University carried out from 1998. The first stage of these experiments involved the transmitter being placed beneath his skin used to control doors lights heaters and other technology around his proximity. We know what you're thinking it's probably not worth the hassle of making yourself a cyborg. If you're going to use it to turn lights off right, this stage of the experiments had a purpose though to test the limits of what Warwick's body would accept. He didn't stop here the second stage of these experiments was more complex involving creating a neural interface developed. Specifically, for this experiment by Dr. Marcus on, that was implanted in 2002 interfacing directly with Warwick's nervous system. The signal produced by Warwick was detailed enough that a robot arm developed by one of Warwick's colleagues was able to mimic the actions of Warwick's own arm without his arm being directly connected to it. That's right you can say the statement captain cyborg can control his own robot arm to refer to a real-life person and the statement would be true. Past phase 2 additional experiments were carried out with an attempt to create a form of telepathy between two subjects via the Internet. The arm of Warwick's wife being implanted with an implant similar to Captain cyborg himself. This was a success resulting in the first purely electronic community between two people's nervous systems. incredible as it may sound there has been a lot of debate about just how far we should be going with this kind of technology. Warwick offered to implant a tracking device into an 11-year old as a method of preventing abduction which was met with ethical concerns from children's charities. Understandably this kind of technology does have the power to do incredible things in advancing the human race. But certain kinds of technology may prove dangerous especially if the environment in which the technology exists promotes these kinds of dangers. Take recent privacy concerns about Facebook which a more primitive example of this kind of technology is being used in a negative way. The real takeaway from this, though is that project cyborg sounds like a film I'd watch in an instant.

Dr. Yang Dan

Dr. Yang Dan
Dr. Yang Dan

You might not be surprised to find out that cats have better eyesight than humans. That's just a given so the mad scientist takes on this situation would be to attempt to see through the eyes of the animal. in 1999 a team of US scientists wired up computer to a cat's brain to take images of what the cat was seeing. Sounds incredibly ambitious and to some extent impossible. But the task was carried out by recording the electrical activity of nerve cells in a region of the brain that receives signals from the eyes. From there the team used a quote linear decoding technique to translate the signals from the cells into images of shapes. dr. yang Dan and her team of scientists conducted 11 separate experiments to see whether they could recognize things such as woodland scenes and faces the images weren't particularly high quality. With the scenes being replicated with a blurred and pixelated quality to them. The explanation for this is the signals received by the region of the brain the thalamus undergo image processing in the higher regions of the brain. This is to help improve the quality and make the return image more clear and as is true in our brains as it is in the cats. The image quality can be improved by sampling more cells though and should this technology develop much further in the future. It's not completely impossible that recording the site of a person will be impossible potentially leading to a situation straight out of a black mirror episode. Seriously the episode is called the entire history of you unsettling stuff.

Robert E Cornish

Robert Cornish
Robert Cornish

Finally, at our number one spot we have Robert E Cornish. The one who sparked the character type in the first place through his own insistence of crossing boundaries that no man should cross there. Doesn't get anything closer to a mad scientist trying to reanimate the dead than cornish. He graduated from the University of California with honors at the age of 22 and just seven years later became interested in the ability to revive the dead. That's right a real-life Victor Frankenstein his impact on the field has been felt on films such as the Lazarus effect and life returns. The second of which he actually acted in at the age of 30. Cornish began experimenting with a seesaw used to get blood flowing back into his recently deceased subjects. He initially tried to restore life to the victim of a heart attack to no avail. But in the following years Cornish attempted to revive two dogs both named Lazarus by using the seesaw method to circulate their blood with a mixture of adrenaline and blood thinners. Here's the really freaky part his experiments as science fictiony as they might seem were actually successful. One paper clipping from the time said quote Dr. Cornish has been reported as saying that, Lazarus the fifth returned nearer normalcy in four days. This is following a passage in the same article stating, Lazarus the fourth has learned to crawl bark and sit up on its haunches. Though the dog is blind and cannot stand alone encouraged by the results, he received. Cornish push to attempt the process on humans a death row inmate. Thomas McMonigle contacted the scientist offering his body for revival after his execution. A petition was drawn up but was also rejected by California law enforcement. Their reason for the rejection the Double Jeopardy Clause basically a Clause of the Fifth Amendment stating that, nor shall any person be subject for the same offense to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb. This is a protection given to citizens of the United States meaning they're not allowed to serve to punishments for the same crime that is they can't be retried after an acquittal or a conviction and can't be given multiple punishments for just one crime. Law enforcement believe that a reanimated murderer would have to be set free as the death penalty would have already been carried out. Cornish never successfully managed to carry out the revival of a dead human which is likely a good thing if he had. We might have zombies walking around today.


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